2014/11/14

Model Altar in the Form of a Temple Facade

This pylon, or gateway, was discovered at Tell el-Amarna. It is related to the cult of the royal family, which has been noticed in stela found in private houses at Amarna. It was believed that the royal family acted as intermediaries between the gods and the people.

Model Altar in the Form of a Temple Facade


This example is a household altar, or shrine, in the form of the pylon of the temple. The walls of the two wings of the pylon are symmetrically decorated with scenes of the king, Queen Nefertiti, and their eldest daughter. They are worshiping and making offerings to the god.

The king with his swollen belly wears the Blue Crown on his customarily exaggerated head. The queen wears a tall Blue Crown and a long transparent garment. The sun disk, the Aten, radiates his benefits of life and energy to the royal couple.

2014/11/13

Column of King Niuserre

Graceful and well-proportioned columns were carved in different styles and topped with capitals in the shape of a lotus, papyrus, or palm. Some columns were also decorated with the head of the goddess Hathor and are called Hathoric columns.

Column of King Niuserre


This six-sided column has a capital in the form of a closed papyrus. It was one of many that supported the ceiling of the temple of Niuserre at Abusir. The names and titles of the king are engraved on its body.

2014/11/12

Model of a Column

Columns were introduced into temples in order to simulate nature and to identify mankind again with nature. The first tentative attempts at columns are still visible in the Step Pyramid of Saqqara. 

Model of a Column


Columns in Ancient Egypt were in many forms such as bundles of papyrus; papyrus stems and lotus stems; palmiform, or palm-like; or campaniform, or bell-shaped.

The capital of this column is in the form of a lotus flower and its details are carved in relief. The shaft is cylindrical and is set on a rounded base.

2014/11/11

18th Dynasty columns

As indicated by isolated cartouches, these three 18th Dynasty columns were made for Tuthmosis IV. Some twohundred years later, they were usurped by Merenptah and Sethos II, and most of the cartouches name these kings. Much later, the columns were reused in the construction of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, where they now serve as supporting elements in rooms I and V.

18th Dynasty columns



2014/11/10

This fragment of limestone comes from the temple of Montuhotep II at Deir el-Bahari. At the left, one notices the forearm and hand of a person who holds the ankh-sign of life.  The rest of the fragment contains three columns of hieroglyphs in finely painted relief.


Fragment from the temple of Montuhotep II at Deir el-Bahari




Funerary relief From Temple of Ptah

This fragment of relief was found in the temple of Ptah during the excavations of W. F. Petrie at Memphis in 1908. Representing a funeral scene stemming from a tomb of the 5th Dynasty, the block was re-used in the Ramesside Period.


Funerary relief From Temple of Ptah

The relief show bearers of offerings who head towards the funerary chapel of the deceased with pomp.

2014/11/09

Relief belongs to Ramessesnakht

This fragment of limestone relief belongs to Ramessesnakht, an important character who had the functions of scribe of the king,  general and majordomo of the Ramesseum and  commander of the archers.

The piece comes from his tomb which was probably situated in the necropolis of Saqqara. On the relief, the head of Toui, the wife of Ramessesnakht, can still be seen.

Relief belongs to Ramessesnakht


She was known as "singer of Hathor, mistress of the Sycamore of the South". This specific title is one of the testimonies in favour of the Memphite provenance of the piece.

2014/11/08

Ptahkouou Offering scene


This limestone relief, part of the Leopold II collection, represents the deceased Ptahkouou seated before an offering table. His title of "chief of craftsmen" and his name are written in large hieroglyphs above his head. His wife, Khenout, who bears the title of "priestess of Hathor", is found just behind him.

Ptahkouou Offering scene

Ptahkouou Offering scene

Ptahkouou Offering scene


The mother of the deceased, Tchentet, is seated on the other side of the offering table. The relief, which dates from the second half of the Old Kingdom, is particularly distinguished by the numerous traces of blue turquoise colour.


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